Jeremy Martin

Jeremy Martin

About Jeremy
Hello, my name is Jeremy Martin, and I'm a wanderer, writer, and whatever else day-to-day life requires. I am fascinated by place, by the journey, by the diversity of ideas and experiences in the world....
Projects
I try to always be working on something for myself: projects like this aren't about producing anything in particular, they're a form of play, play is a way of exploring, and the best part of...

About The Restless Lens

Welcome to The Restless Lens, where you’ll find my personal interests, inspirations, ideas, and work, all outside the walls of social media; independent, strange, eclectic, typically mediocre, and completely un-monetizable, this is the way the internet should be.

My Writing

Visions of the Apocalypse
Visions of the Apocalypse
I have, for many years now, frequently found myself held rapt by unexpected visions of the apocalypse. Upon a rooftop bar, for example, I will...
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The Eclipse
The Eclipse
This morning I've noticed that many accounts of yesterday's total eclipse contain a statement along the lines of "I was not prepared for how beautiful/spiritual/amazing...
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The Key and the String
The Key and the String
Addie and I are staying the month in a small and very lovely war-era Dutch row house, which our host generously gives us freedom to...
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A Brief Guide to My Emoji Usage
A Brief Guide to My Emoji Usage
I was sending someone a text message the other day and needed just the right emoji. The conversation was completely over by the time I...
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Interesting Links

Parlez-Nous A Boire
Parlez-Nous A Boire
One of my favorite songs in the world is “Parlez-Nous A Boire,” or “Let’s talk about drinking.” The title alone, which is also the first...
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Badass Women
Badass Women
It's painfully obvious to anyone paying attention that history tends to be a little (a lot), well, skewed toward the male side of things. All...
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Against Argument
Because there's no shortage of writing about politics (if thats still what we're calling it these days), I'm especially refreshed when I read a new and...
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Mapping Above and Below the City
Mapping Above and Below the City
If you're anything like me, its impossible to follow a set of stairs into any subway system without wondering how everything above ground interfaces with...
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Kill The Parking
Kill The Parking
Mexico City is ditching parking requirements for new development. Why in the world would one of the most traffic-congested cities in the world (a ranking...
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The Eastern Capital
The Eastern Capital
Here's a vaguely architectural project that impinges upon the more pleasant periphery of the artistic: imagine a project to rebrand China as a cultural rather...
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No Home Go Home
No Home Go Home
Words paired with sketches my using tea left ink, entitled "No Home Go Home / Go Home No Home." What could be more satisfying these...
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Read On

Expression, curation, and exploration. Check out specific categories in the menu above, or the full stream below.

The Eclipse

This morning I’ve noticed that many accounts of yesterday’s total eclipse contain a statement along the lines of “I was not prepared for how beautiful/spiritual/amazing it was,” with which, having been fortunate enough to witness totality first-hand yesterday, I wholeheartedly agree. Why is this reaction so apparently universal? I don’t …

Scenario

What if this eclipse somehow just didn’t happen? It would be even more terrifying for us than the eclipse was to people a thousand years ago. Suddenly, some very hard questions would need to be asked. Unrest; scientists, facing an incredulous public, desperately search for the moon, finally discovering that 60 years ago a researcher (the fourth of five listed authors of a widely-cited paper on the computer modeling of lunar orbital mechanics) incorrectly translated a punch-card into COBOL, because the process is mind-numbing, nothing like the life of the astronaut he wants to be, but anyway, in his distraction, he introduced a small, but compounding error. In the mean time we’ve burned down all the universities for nothing, all the scientists are in hiding, we’re all chain smoking and using computers to bludgeon livestock. The pope’s army is marching on the space station, and the caliph’s call echoes through Valles Marineris…

Badass Women

It’s painfully obvious to anyone paying attention that history tends to be a little (a lot), well, skewed toward the male side of things. All the big decisions, we are taught, are made by men. Ditto for all the big innovations, and its always men that seem to be making the big differences in the course of nations and cultures. All bullshit, of course: women have been along for the ride every step of the way, insistently making their own difference, and the blatant interference of the patriarchy means that the women who fought hard enough to make a difference are unequivocally badass. Take Anita Brenner, for example, I doubt you’ve heard of her (I hadn’t). A Mexican-born, American Jew, disowned by pretty much all three adjectives in that label, finds herself up in the middle of the post-Mexican Revolution explosion of arts that included the likes of Diego Rivera, Clemente Orozco, and, of course, Frida Khalo. Brenner was convinced that art had a vital role to play in the establishment of Mexican identity post-revolution, and her steadfast efforts to nurture, connect, and promote Mexican art makes her one badass woman, and an absolute hero to me. Let’s face it: the world wouldn’t be worth half the nonsense we have to endure if it wasn’t for badass women like Anita Brenner.

Which makes me wonder: what other badass women am I totally unaware of? Not just Marie Curie or Hillary Clinton, who’s fame matches their accomplishments. Who do you feel hasn’t been recognized? Enlighten me in the comments! Let’s stop talking about outspoken men of weak intellect and self-image issues and talk more about badass women. Demand more badass women in the history books!!!

Against Argument

Because there’s no shortage of writing about politics (if thats still what we’re calling it these days), I’m especially refreshed when I read a new and well-considered viewpoint on what is, obviously enough to me and a few other people, more than an issue of ideology or personality. Our world is shaped by our decisions and behaviors, often in unexpected ways. Adam Thirlwell of the Paris Review does a great job here of relating ourselves to this world we’ve inadvertently created.

Mapping Above and Below the City

If you’re anything like me, its impossible to follow a set of stairs into any subway system without wondering how everything above ground interfaces with everything below ground. Even a rudimentary set of orientation instincts tells you that what is happening in these tunnels is not directly mirrored above ground. So, needless to say, I find these X-ray maps of NYC subway stations by Candy Chan absolutely fascinating. I love the approach to mapping and architecture shown in these drawings!